A team of astronomers believe they have spotted the first moon outside our solar system.

Phys.org reports that the team lead by Dr. David Kipping, assistant professor of astronomy at Columbia University, has spotted what might be the first evidence of a moon orbiting an exoplanet. By harnessing data from the Hubble Space Telescope, researchers have identified an exomoon candidate, called Kepler-1625b.

KEYS TO LIFE? SCIENTISTS EXPLAIN HOW NEWLY-DISCOVERED EXOPLANETS COULD BE HABITABLE

Kepler-1625b, which is orbiting the star Kepler-1625, is approximately 4,000 light years away, according to the report.

A light year, which measures distance in space, equals 6 trillion miles.

ALIEN LIFE LOOMS? NEWLY DISCOVERED EXOPLANET MAY BE BEST CANDIDATE, EXPERTS SAY

The BBC reports that the exomoon may have the size and mass of Neptune, and is circling a planet about the size of Jupiter, but with 10 times the mass.

A paper on the exomoon has been published on the Arvix.org site. “Exomoons represent an outstanding challenge in modern astronomy, with the potential to provide rich insights into planet formation theory and habitability,” explained the astronomers behind the research.

 



Source link

(Visited 4 times, 1 visits today)